20 10 / 2014

thedogist:

Teddy, Yorkshire Terrier (8 y/o) – Available for adoption from @ASPCA, NYC. Bone given by @song.younga • thedogist.com/giveadogabone

thedogist:

Teddy, Yorkshire Terrier (8 y/o) – Available for adoption from @ASPCA, NYC. Bone given by @song.younga • thedogist.com/giveadogabone

20 10 / 2014

Anonymous said: You answered a message a while ago where you said that you found the idea of attraction fascinating and that fanart interests you because it's the "female gaze." I can't remember exactly how you worded it but I've been thinking about that so much lately. Could you maybe expand on that idea a little? I know it's easy to brush fanart off as meaningless and unoriginal but the fact that you put so much work into it tells me you feel differently. Thanks!

euclase:

Uh I can try. This might be rambling nonsense yooooo.

I think the idea of attraction and beauty is fascinating (and kind of hugely disturbing), especially as it applies to girls and how girls are marketed to. Girls are taught, pretty much from the time we’re toddlers, that we are not good enough. Not attractive enough. Entire corporations have been built around the idea of making ladies feel bad about themselves.

If you want a man to buy a car, you reassure him that he’s awesome and deserves awesome stuff to go with his awesome manliness. Women are told just the opposite. Whatever we look like, whatever kinds of bodies we have—we must be changed. We’re raised to believe we began life flawed. And, more disturbingly, we’re raised to view ourselves as men view us.

Women are constantly looking at themselves and each other as we imagine men would look at us.

So fan art made by girls, in my opinion, is a very important thing. It’s not conventional, obviously. It’s not generally accepted as legitimate art, or even art at all, partly because it’s copyrighted characters, but partly too because it topples the notion that men get to have a say in what ladies are allowed to look at. It’s a way for girls to reclaim authority over their own gazes. Fan art is how girls say, “I want to look at this and enjoy it for myself, and I want to enjoy it with other girls.”

But it’s more than that. Because plenty of things are marketed to ladies. Playgirl and Viva. Glamour magazine. Talk shows. Obviously there are lots of things marketed to girls that cater to the female gaze.

But fan art, along with fanfiction, is one of the few things where the content, which was originally marketed to the mainstream (by men and for men—and specifically straight, white men), is being reclaimed by women. There’s a power shift that occurs. What once belonged to men has been reinvented by women, celebrated by women, and shared among women.

I think that’s awesome? I’m sure my thoughts have holes in them because I’m replying to this message while eating cereal, and I am not a women’s studies expert like not even close. And I know lots of people say, especially about my stuff, “Well, it’s just copying photos, even for fan art. It’s not original. You’re not really reinventing anything if you’re just drawing a portrait.”

And that really misses the point. Because I spent time with what I thought was attractive, whether aesthetically attractive or emotionally interesting or otherwise, and that was my time. No one else had input. It’s like buying a product without buying the bullshit invalidating message that went with it.

And that’s why fan art is valuable to me? I made myself the sovereign of my own gaze. 

20 10 / 2014

anneursu:

As you may have heard, John Grisham gave an interview with The Telegraph in which he lambasted the US judicial system for excessive incarceration—including that of “Sixty-year-old white men in prison” whose only crimes were consuming child pornography.

“…But they got online…

20 10 / 2014

20 10 / 2014

Anonymous said: Thoughts on Malala winning?

thatsnotwatyourmomsaid:

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conclusion: Malala is amazing and Western civilization has yet again proven to be hypercritical ignorant uncompromising and evil. how very fitting for columbus day.

20 10 / 2014

medievalpoc:

metaquarry:

medievalpoc:

The idea behind this radical new treatment came from Africa, specifically from a slave named Onesimus, who shared his knowledge with Cotton Mather, the town’s leading minister and his legal owner. Boston still suffered dreadfully, but thanks to Onesimus and Mather, the terror linked to smallpox began to recede after Africans rolled up their sleeves—literally—to show Boston how inoculation worked. The story of how Boston began to overcome smallpox illustrates the strife that epidemics can cause, but also the encouraging notion that humans can communicate remedies as quickly as they communicate germs—and that the solutions we most need often come from the places we least expect to find them.

Mather had come close to choosing a career in medicine, and devoured the scientific publications of the Royal Society in London. As the society began to turn its attention to inoculation practices around the world, Mather realized that he had an extraordinary expert living in his household. Onesimus was a “pretty Intelligent Fellow,” it had become clear to him. When asked if he’d ever had smallpox, Onesimus answered “Yes and No,” explaining that he had been inoculated with a small amount of smallpox, which had left him immune to the disease. Fascinated, Mather asked for details, which Onesimus provided, and showed him his scar. We can almost hear Onesimus speaking in Mather’s accounts, for Mather took the unusual step of writing out his words with the African accent included—the key phrase was, “People take Juice of Small-Pox; and Cutty-skin, and Putt in a Drop.”

Excited, he investigated among other Africans in Boston and realized that it was a widespread practice; indeed, a slave could be expected to fetch a higher price with a scar on his arm, indicating that he was immune. Mather sent the Royal Society his own reports from the wilds of America, eager to prove the relevance of Boston (and by extension, Cotton Mather) to the global crusade against infectious disease. His interviews with Onesimus were crucial. In 1716, writing to an English friend, he promised that he would be ready to promote inoculation if smallpox ever visited the city again.

American History, but something I think a lot of people would be interested to read.

And here’s a biographical essay about Onesimus from the W.E.B. DuBois Research Center.

Thank you!

(via tamorapierce)

20 10 / 2014

agentotter:

Elders of the Heiltsuk First Nation along the B.C. central coast have long recognized the difference between coastal and inland grey wolves in their territory.

Now, new scientific evidence helps prove it.

A study by Victoria-based researchers, published today in the open-access journal BMC Ecology, affirms genetic, ecological and behavioural differences between coastal and mainland wolves living in close proximity to each other.

Read More

OH GOSH YOU GUYS THIS IS SO NEAT. THIS IS LIKE EXTRA SUPER DOUBLE NEAT. These coastal wolves have adapted to their specific environment and instead of like elk and mountain goats they eat fuckin MUSSELS AND SEALS AND FUCKIN BARNACLES OKAY.

Darimont said the research shows how ecological development might drive genetic differences and would have significant conservation implications if the wolves are recognized as marine mammals, similar to polar bears.

Paul Paquet, a senior Raincoast scientist and supervisor of the study, said: “It is imperative that responsible government agencies now recognize coastal wolves are unique and take the opportunity to design management plans that reflect the uniqueness, rather than defaulting to simplistic policies that are convenient but inappropriate from a conservation perspective.”

Also, you can learn a lot here about the sad and frankly laughable way that scientists often dismiss the contributions of incredibly knowledgeable local and indigenous people. The scientist is just like “oh yeah this Heiltsuk elder told me about this way back and I totally brushed it off.” And now a DECADE later it’s in the news because he’s researched it. Come on man step up your game.

This is still TOO COOL though I’m totally excited, WOLVES HOW DO THEY WORK. (Here’s the actual research paper that explains how they work, in case you wanna look at some charts and things.)

(Source: thewinterotter, via fullpelt)

20 10 / 2014

19 10 / 2014

ucblove:

Nicole doing good work.

(Source: iriswst, via leilacohanmiccio)

19 10 / 2014

housingworksbookstore:

dukeofbookingham:

It’s just like:

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Please can Robert Downey Jr explain all of writing for us please?

AW